Looking back: Tazio Nuvolari

image002FF today looks at a great grand prix racing driver before F1 era. Many say the greatest. The name is Tazio Nuvolari. Nuvolari is a legend in Italy. He started racing four wheelers only at the age of 31! He was known for virtuousity and courage which grew his legend.

Tazio Nuvolari was a man that really lived for racing. Neither bad equipment nor wounds from his uncountable crashes could keep him from driving flat out. Known to the Italians fans as the “Flying Mantuan” or the “Great Little Man”, Nuvolari was just 160 cm tall and he soon found out that he did not have the muscular strength to force the cars around the corners with the steering wheel. So instead he developed a technique where he put his car into a four wheel slide and then controlled the slide with the trottle. More here at Autosport.

“Tazio Nuvolari was not simply a racing driver. To Italy he became an idol, a demi-god, a legend, epitomising all that young Italy aspired to be; the man who ‘did the impossible’, not once but habitually, the David who slew the Goliaths in the great sport of motor racing. He was Il Maestro.”—Cyril Posthumus

A Video tribute to Flying Mantuan

Rare photographs of Flying Mantuan

1935 Nurburgring GP

1938 Donington GP

In 1976, Italian singer-songwriter Lucio Dalla wrote the song Nuvolari celebrating his myth. The song is still very famous in Italy, and it’s part of Dalla’s album Automobili .

Song

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FOTA teams submit entry

So, is everything again back to normal at F1? Looks like it. The FOTA teams today have all submitted F1 entries for 2010. The FOTA said, however, that their entries were conditional on a new Concorde Agreement being signed by all parties before 12th June.

The threat of Ferrari, Toyota, Red Bull and Renault appears to be over.

The statement reads:

“FOTA confirms all its members’ long-term commitment to be involved in the FIA Formula One World Championship and has unanimously agreed further and significant actions to substantially reduce the costs of competing in the championship in the next three years, creating a mechanism that will preserve the technological competition and the sporting challenge and, at the same time, facilitate the entry in the F1 Championship for new teams.

“These measures are in line with what has already been decided in 2009 within FOTA, achieving important saving on engines and gearboxes.

“All FOTA teams have entered the 2010 championship on the basis that:

“1) The Concorde Agreement is signed by all parties before 12th June 2009, after which all FOTA teams will commit to competing in Formula One until 2012.

“The renewal of the Concorde Agreement will provide security for the future of the sport by binding all parties in a formal relationship that will ensure stability via sound governance.

“2) The basis of the 2010 regulations will be the current 2009 regulations, amended in accordance with proposals that FOTA has submitted to the FIA.

“All FOTA teams’ entries for the 2010 FIA Formula One world championship have been submitted today on the understanding that (a) all FOTA teams will be permitted to compete during the 2010 Formula One season on an identical regulatory basis and (b) that they may only be accepted as a whole.

“All FOTA teams now look forward with optimism to collaborating proactively and productively with the FIA, with a view to establishing a solid foundation on which the future of a healthy and successful Formula One can be built, providing lasting stability and sound governance.”

Meanwhile, Prodrive and Lola have also submitted for 2010 entry.

All in all, it seems that Max Mosley has finally backed down on his weird vision! Can he now let the racing continue in peace?

Williams suspended from FOTA

On Monday, Williams broke ranks with the other Formula 1 teams and put in an entry for the 2010 season. In retaliation FOTA have temporarily suspended Williams.

“FOTA’s decision, although regrettable, is understandable,” says Sir Frank Williams. “However, as a racing team and a company whose only business is Formula One, with obligations to our partners and our employees, submitting our entry to next year’s Championship was unquestionable.

In addition, we are legally obliged under our contract with FOM and the FIA to participate in the World Championship until the end of 2012.”

FOTA discussions concern the longer term issues which affect all the teams and Williams suspension is a sign that the association would like to stand united and actions of those who will break rank will not be tolerated.

Monaco GP: Jenson does it again

monaco_grand_prix_skyMonaco GP is the epitome of Formula 1 racing. Only Le Mans 24 hours and Indianopolis 500 comes in the same league. In this edition of Monaco GP, Jenson Button led Brawn GP cars 1-2 along with Rubens Barrichello for third time this season. Button now has 5 victories in first 6 races and race by race he is closer than ever to WDC. The race was not classic and Button led from start to finish. There was not a single mistake throughout the race that he made. Brawn GP cars are way ahead of the pack right now and this looks like their year through and through.

The World Championships table currently stands as follows:
1. Button 51 pts
2. Baarrichello 35 pts
3. Vettel 23 pts

Table doesn’t lie!

Week round-up

This was a busy week for me and i even missed Catalunya GP. Congratulations to Jenson Button for the victory but my heart goes out to Rubens Barrichello and Sebastian Vettel.

Apart from the race there is a huge power tussle within F1 with manufacturers are up in arms against FIA. After the budget crap proposed by FIA for 2010 the manufacturers are united more than ever.  As foolish as Max Mosley is, he also went on to say that F1 can survive without Ferrari. Ferrari, the most decorated team of F1, even released an article on their site that they made F1 great along with threat to withdraw from championship next year. The threat was reaffirmed by the Piero Ferrari,the son of great Enzo Ferrari. Red Bull, Renault and Toyota soon came out and themselves threatened that the current state of F1 may force them to turn their heads elsewhere.

The analysts are out to see all the possible outcomes. But for me one thing is clear, if Ferrari leave F1 i will watch them wherever they go.

Above all, i am very frustated by F1 politics, may be not as much as Lewis Hamilton.

Looking back: Ferrari legends

Yesterday from my blog post on an article from grandprix.com i got nostalgic over the Ferrari legend.

“Ferrari is a much stronger brand than F1. The Prancing Horse is far more evocative than the rather pedestrian F1 logo. Ferrari is by far the most popular team in F1. McLaren attracts fans with its glitzy technology, Williams gets support because of the passion of its owners, Minardi was very popular because of its underdog status but the only team that fans go wild for is Ferrari – and it does not matter who is driving. It is not only red-blooded Italians who follow Ferrari. It has the same following all over the world. Why? Because Ferrari has a great heritage in competition. It is a team of legend. The Ferrari brand relies not on the fact that rich people by the road cars it builds – that is true of many companies – but rather because there is a mystique about Ferrari which people want a part of. Ferrari has long represented Italian pride and style, the red cars being a symbol of all that Italy does well.” – grandprix.com

Below is a fan video from youtube featuring past Ferrari drivers Alberto Ascari, Juan Manuel Fangio, Mike Hawthorn, Phil Hill, John Surtees, Niki Lauda, Jody Scheckter, Michael Schumacher, Wolfgang von Trips, Jacky Ickx and Gilles Villenueve.

An interesting article at grandprix.com, The rattling of sabres…

F1 can survive Ferrari loss

“The sport could survive without Ferrari,” the FT quoted FIA President Max Mosley as saying.

Ferrari last fight with FIA

So Mosley has now said his piece. And we must wait to see the reaction from Ferrari. The team has been to the brink with the FIA before, notably in the mid 1980s when Enzo Ferrari and Jean-Marie Balestre (the then head of the sporting arm of the FIA) got into a fight over the future engine rules. In July 1985 Ferrari threatened to withdraw from F1 and switch to Indycar racing. To push the point Enzo Ferrari sent his sporting director Marco Piccinini to visit an Indycar race at Michigan. Balestre said he would not be swayed by Ferrari threats. A month later Indycar team owner Jim Trueman and his crew chief Steve Horne visited Maranello and in the months that followed the Italian team recruited a design team and built a Ferrari Indycar. This was completed by July 1987 by which time the two parties had come to their senses and hammered out a suitable compromise.

Ferrari legend

The FIA knows that Ferrari is a much stronger brand than F1. The Prancing Horse is far more evocative than the rather pedestrian F1 logo. Ferrari is by far the most popular team in F1. McLaren attracts fans with its glitzy technology, Williams gets support because of the passion of its owners, Minardi was very popular because of its underdog status but the only team that fans go wild for is Ferrari – and it does not matter who is driving. It is not only red-blooded Italians who follow Ferrari. It has the same following all over the world. Why? Because Ferrari has a great heritage in competition. It is a team of legend. The Ferrari brand relies not on the fact that rich people by the road cars it builds – that is true of many companies – but rather because there is a mystique about Ferrari which people want a part of. Ferrari has long represented Italian pride and style, the red cars being a symbol of all that Italy does well.

Both parties need each other

The threat to depart and the FIA’s stance that Ferrari is not that important are both charades. Yes, the sport would survive without Ferrari and Ferrari would survive without F1, but both would be poorer if that were the case. All the talk is therefore not to be taken too seriously.

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